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Energy: Renewable and Non-Renewable: Graphic Approach Discuss this eTheme.

These sites deal with energy in many forms, both renewable and non-renewable. Learn about hydroelectric power, fossil fuels, nuclear power, wave power, fuel cells, solar power, geothermal, wind power, and biomass. Students can view many photographs on energy. NOTE: Many of the sites require that Shockwave Flash be installed on your computer in order to view content; this software is generally downloadable from the Internet free of charge. Also, some require the use of headphones or speakers to listen to audio files. Included are eThemes resources on windmills and energy.

Grades

  • 4,
  • 5,
  • 6,
  • 7,
  • 8,
  • 9,
  • 10,
  • 11,
  • 12

Links

Students can read this overview "Energy and the Earth." NOTE: The site includes ads.
Learn about the differences between fossil energy, nuclear energy, and renewable energy in this animation. Click on the directional arrow in the top right hand corner of the page to advance to more content. NOTE: The site requires that Flash player software be downloaded and installed on your computer in order to view content.
Click on "Definition" to begin the instruction module on fossil fuels, and then on the directional arrow at the top of the page to advance to more content. Includes a self-test at the end of the presentation to test students' learning. NOTE: This site requires that a Flash player be installed on your computer in order to view content.
Students can test their knowledge of fossil fuels with this eight question interactive quiz. NOTE: This site requires that Flash player be installed on your computer in order to view the content.
Learn how fossil fuels create greenhouse gasses which in turn contributes to global climate change. Click on the directional arrow in the upper right hand corner of the screen to advance to subsequent content. NOTE: This site requires that Flash player software be installed on your computer in order to view content.
See how nuclear energy is made and what becomes of the depleted uranium which is created as a by-product of the process. NOTE: In order to view the animation, Flash software must be installed on your computer.
Read about how solar cells create usable energy and see the animation which accompanies the dialogue. Click on the green "Step Forward" icon in the lower right hand corner of the page to advance to subsequent pages of content. NOTE: In order to view the content on this page, you must have Flash player software installed on your computer.
Learn about the wind power energy cycle (what it is and how it works) in this interactive animation. Click on the letters in the diagram to find out the components of the cycle and read the explanation on the right hand side of the screen to learn about the details. NOTE: This site requires that Flash software be installed on your computer in order to view content.
This site discusses biomass energy, what it is, where it comes from, how it is used, and if it causes pollution. Click on one of these general areas to find out more, then click on on of the directional arrows at the top of the page to view more content. Includes a matching game. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash player software be downloaded to your computer in order to view content.
Learn about some of the various plants that the BP corporation is hoping to create biofuels from. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash player software be installed on your computer in order to view content.
Learn about how fuel cells can be an alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Click on the directional arrow in the lower right hand corner of the page to see more content. Also, you may click on "Main Menu" to see the main page. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash software be installed on your computer in order to view the content of the site.
This site has a photograph of a geyser and an explanation of geothermal energy. Students can explore "Biomass," "Hydro," "Solar," "Wave," and "Wind." NOTE: The site includes ads.
Watch this animation about how geothermal power is generated. Click on the links below the animation in order from left to right to view the sequence. NOTE: This site requires that Flash player be installed on your computer in order to view the content.
This animation explains how energy is created using geothermal energy. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash be installed on your computer in order to view content.
This interactive diagram shows how hydroelectric energy is created from dams. Click on the "Play" icon to begin the animation. NOTE: You must have Shockwave Flash installed on your computer to view the content.
Another Shockwave Flash animation on hydroelectric power.
Watch this interactive animation about wave power and the LIMPET power station in Great Britain. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash be installed on your computer in order to view the content.
This video includes information on new devices that create power form waves and are inspired by sea creatures. NOTE: This site includes ads and links to social networking sites. NOTE: This site requires that Shockwave Flash be installed on your computer.
Students can view these photographs of diesel and gas-engine power plants in Australia and the Pacific.
These websites are about windmills and wind energy. Students can learn about the history of windmills, their construction, and uses such as grinding grain, pumping water, and generating electricity. There are pictures of windmills, animations, videos to watch, and several designs for building model windmills or other simple wind machines.
These websites are about energy resources, but renewable and non-renewable. You can find information on fossil fuels, solar power, wind power, geothermal energy, hydroelectricity, biomass energy, fuel cells, and nuclear power. There are statistics, experiments, videos, interviews with scientists, and lesson plans.

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