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Literature: "The Westing Game" by Ellen Raskin

These sites are about The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. There is information about the book, the characters, and the author. There are lesson plans, activities, and quizzes. Included are supplementary sites about the stock market, chess, fireworks, mysteries, and more.

Grades

  • 6

Links

Here are three activities that use art and writing and can be used in conjunction with the book.
Roll your mouse over the windows to explore the characters and plot elements in The Westing Game. This site has descriptions of all the major characters, plus author information, interactive games, and a chess tutorial. NOTE: This site contains a guestbook. NOTE: Many of the links on the "Sources" page are broken, and teachers may want to preview these sources before use in the classroom.
Take this quiz to test your knowledge of the characters in The Westing Game. There are two versions, matching or flashcards.
This site has a biography of the author and information about her other books and awards. Follow the links to see the original manuscript and working drafts of The Westing Game. There is also an audio file of the author talking about her work.
Turtle Wexler plays the stock market. You can start learning about stocks on this fun, interactive site. Pick a company from the menu, and Wally will tell you about its stock.
Here is a thorough introduction to chess. The board and pieces, basic strategy, advanced tactics, and chess puzzles are all covered.
This site has lessons, games, and printable resources for kids who are interested in learning how to play chess.
Chris Theodorakis watches birds and wants to become an ornithologist. Students can learn about birding on this site.
Students can gain an understanding of the story elements and vocabulary associated with the mystery genre in this lesson plan. After completing the activities, students may then write their own mystery stories.
Use this activity after reading or before writing a mystery to summarize the elements of the story.
This is a glossary of terms associated with mystery writing.
Here is a mystery writing workshop with late author Joan Lowery Nixon. You can read a short mystery story by the author, and then review writing tips, challenges, and revision guidelines before writing a mystery of your own.
Explore the links to find activities, writing prompts, and Westing Game Jeopardy!
This site tells you all about fireworks, including the anatomy of a firework shell, the science behind the displays, and the most popular varieties. Video clips and animations are included.

Education Standards

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